The GTE Difference

The Credit Union Difference

Credit Unions are financial institutions that offer the same products and services as banks but we operate quite differently. As a not-for-profit financial cooperative, we're formed by and continue to be owned by you, our members, with the purpose of beneficially serving and helping each other – hence the credit union philosophy of “people helping people”. This means our decisions are made with your needs in mind, rather than dictated by profits or anonymous shareholders.

Finally, a financial organization you can love – and one that loves you back!

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Credit Unions vs. Banks

There’s a saying that once you join a credit union, you don’t care what the banks are doing. Well, it may not be a saying yet, but it’s definitely catching on.

What’s the difference between a credit union and a bank? We’re so glad you asked! We think you’ll agree that handling your financial business with a credit union as your partner is the way to go – for lots of reasons:

GTE Financial

You’re a member! Every member owns a share of our financial cooperative.
The organization is run by a volunteer, unpaid Board of Directors that is elected by the membership.

We’re not-for-profit and motivated by what’s best for our membership. Profits are returned to members in benefits like higher yields, lower rates and fees as well as new products and services.

GTE is locally owned and operated.



Enjoy no strings, FREE Checking and Savings accounts.



GTE offers all the virtual conveniences you want like Online Banking, Bill Pay, person-to-person payments and remote deposit capture, and 28,000 ATMs absolutely free to members.

 

Additional member benefits like financial literacy programs, contests and giveaways throughout the year, as well as appreciation events!

Banks

Banks are owned by and answer to paid executives and stockholders.




As publically traded companies whose profits are driven by pleasing stockholders, decisions are often made based on whether the stockholders benefit.


Big banks are operated on a national level, often with high operating expenses that are passed on to the bank customer.

Banks often include fees or charges for checking and savings accounts such as minimum balance fees or debit card usage fees.

You may be able to use virtual services, but they often come with additional costs.




 


You might get a lollipop in the drive-thru.